Just another Rainbow Christian's Blog

Posts tagged ‘Holiday’

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This Hippie wishes you a Happy Valentine’s Day!!

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Hippie Valentine!

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Veggie Valentine

Veggie Valentine

Cabbage always has a heart;
Green beans string along.
You’re such a Tomato,
Will you Peas to me belong?

You’ve been the Apple of my eye,
You know how much I care;
So Lettuce get together,
We’d make a perfect Pear.

Now, something’s sure to Turnip,
To prove you can’t be Beet;
So, if you Carrot all for me
Let’s let our Tulips meet.

Don’t Squash my hopes and dreams now,
Bee my Honey, dear;
Or tears will fill Potato’s eyes,
While Sweet Corn lends an ear.

I’ll Cauliflower shop and say
Your dreams are Parsley mine.
I’ll work and share my Celery,
So be my Valentine.

“MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY NEW YEAR”

Here’s something that you might find helpful as you do your last minute Christmas Holiday errands.

Sorry, I haven’t a clue on the correct way to pronounce these,

“MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY NEW YEAR” IN 40 LANGUAGES

Apache (Western) – Gozhqq Keshmish

B>Arabic – I’D Miilad Said ous Sana Saida

Croatian – Sretan Bozic

Danish – Glædelig Jul og godt nytår

Farsi – Sal-e no mubarak

French – Joyeux Noël et Bonne Année!

German – Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr!

Greek – Kala Christougenna Ki’eftihismenos O Kenourios Chronos

Hawaiian – Mele Kalikimaka & Hauoli Makahiki Hou

Hebrew – Mo’adim Lesimkha. Shanah Tova

Hindi – Shubh Naya Baras

Iraqi – Idah Saidan Wa Sanah Jadidah

Irish – Nollaig Shona Dhuit

Iroquois – Ojenyunyat Sungwiyadeson homungradon nagwutut & Ojenyunyat osrasay

Italian – Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo

Japanese – Shinnen omedeto. Kurisumasu Omedeto

Korean – Sung Tan Chuk Ha

Kyrghyz – JangI jIlIngIz guttuu bolsun!

Latin – Pax hominibus bonae voluntatis

Maori – Kia orana e kia manuia rava i teia Kiritimeti e te Mataiti Ou

Mongolian – Zul saryn bolon shine ony mend devshuulye

Nepali – krist Yesu Ko Shuva Janma Utsav Ko Upalaxhma Hardik Shuva & Naya Barsa Ko harkik Shuvakamana

Norweigan/Nynorsk – Eg ynskjer hermed Dykk alle ein God Jul og Godt Nyttår

Polish – Wesolych Swiat i Szczesliwego Nowego Roku.

Portuguese – Boas Festas e um feliz Ano Novo

Romanian – Craciun fericit si un An Nou fericit!

Russian – Pozdrevlyayu s prazdnikom Rozhdestva i s Novim Godom

Samoan – Ia manuia le Kilisimasi ma le tausaga fou

Somali – ciid wanaagsan iyo sanad cusub oo fiican.

Spanish – Feliz Navidad y Próspero Año Nuevo

Sudanese – Wilujeng Natal Sareng Warsa Enggal

Swedish – God Jul och Gott Nytt År

Tagalog – Maligayang Pasko at Manigong Bagong Taon

Tahitian – Ia ora i te Noere e ia ora na i te matahiti ‘api

Thai – Suksan Wan Christmas lae Sawadee Pee Mai

Ukrainian – Veseloho Vam Rizdva i Shchastlyvoho Novoho Roku!

Vietnamese – Chuc Mung Giang Sinh – Chuc Mung Tan Nien
Zulu – Sinifesela Ukhisimusi Omuhle Nonyaka Omusha Onempumelelo

See the full list of 350+ languages:
http://snipurl.com/350languages

Live simply. Love generously.
Care deeply. Speak kindly.
Leave the rest to God.

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FAIR USE NOTICE:

This blog may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc.

This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

This material is distributed without profit

Every 3.6 seconds a real person dies from hunger somewhere in the world!!!
Feed a hungry person today:

http://www.hungersite.com

My YouTube Channel
http://www.youtube.com/Ninure

God is still speaking
http://www.stillspeaking.com

John Mark Ministries
http://jmm.aaa.net.au/

TWO VERY DIFFERENT HOLIDAYS

The fact that the “Christmas Seasin” actually seems to start in October has bugged me for quite a few years noe.

Not because I “hate” Christmas, but because of what the Holiday has become. Perhaps the one good thing that may come out of the finacial crisis this year is that many people are re-hinking the whole “gift-giving” thingie.

More than one person told me that they will be giving fewer “gifts” per-person, and that whatever gifts they give will REALLY mean something this year.

So…..as we listen to another round of “the War on Christmas” let us pause and consider:

TWO VERY DIFFERENT HOLIDAYS

     I heard about a teacher who asked the children in her class about the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. She thought it might be effective to inch toward its meaning by having them playfully correct some wrong ideas.

     “Now let me think,” she began. “Thanksgiving. That’s the day when we think about all the stuff we have. And how we want more things than anybody else has. And how we don’t care about anybody but ourselves. And . . .”

     “No!” the preschool kids were starting to chorus! “No-o-o!”

     Then one little guy in the middle of the pack looked up and chirped, “That’s not Thanksgiving, Miss Michelle. That’s Christmas!”

     As we begin the transition in this country from Thanksgiving to Christmas, there does indeed seem to be a world of difference in the way these two holidays are viewed.  Thanksgiving is one of the few holidays left which has not been ruined by commercialism.  It is still a relatively “pure” time of giving thanks to God for our bountiful blessings.  Christmas, on the other hand…….

     What should be a time when we are able to take great joy in giving to others (for “it is more blessed to give than to receive”, Acts 20:35) and a time to remember the great gift that God has given us through Jesus Christ, has (for many) turned instead to a stressful, hectic time when we are focused on ourselves and our wants

     Allow me to make a suggestion based on an ancient Jewish practice.  The Jews had a day set aside, like our day of Thanksgiving, to remember how God had blessed them as a nation and taken care of them in their darkest hour.  Purim was a day of “gladness and feasting…and for sending presents to one another.” (Esther 9:19).

     However, there was one major difference in their practice and ours (though there shouldn’t be).  Their thanksgiving resulted in gift giving, but not just to friends and family.  They had a practice of “sending presents to one another and gifts to the poor.” (Esther 9:22).

     This past week, we all had opportunity to give thanks to God for how He has blessed us.  We need to remember that with blessings come responsibilities — and we have a responsibility to use our blessings to God’s glory.  In the weeks ahead, may you truly know the joy of using your blessings not merely to make your family happy, but to share with others around you who are in need.

Have a great day!

Alan Smith
Helen Street Church of Christ
Fayetteville, North Carolina

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FAIR USE NOTICE:

This blog may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc.

This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

This material is distributed without profit
Every 3.6 seconds a real person dies from hunger somewhere in the world!!!
Feed a hungry person today:
http://www.hungersite.com

My YouTube Channel
http://www.youtube.com/Ninure

God is still speaking
http://www.stillspeaking.com

John Mark Ministries
http://jmm.aaa.net.au/

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